In Pictures: 2015 i98FM Camp Quality Convoy

By: Greg Bush


Spectators’ vehicles kept with the theme. Spectators’ vehicles kept with the theme. Spectators’ vehicles kept with the theme.
Allan Doherty’s Peterbilt leads the convoy along the Princes Motorway. Allan Doherty’s Peterbilt leads the convoy along the Princes Motorway. Allan Doherty’s Peterbilt leads the convoy along the Princes Motorway.
The McMahon’s Transport People’s Truck was the second-highest lead truck bidder. The McMahon’s Transport People’s Truck was the second-highest lead truck bidder. The McMahon’s Transport People’s Truck was the second-highest lead truck bidder.
The NSW Police are big supporters of the convoy. The NSW Police are big supporters of the convoy. The NSW Police are big supporters of the convoy.
Lead truck bidder Allan Doherty may have been camera shy, but not so his granddaughters Kate (left) and Chloe Bradley. Lead truck bidder Allan Doherty may have been camera shy, but not so his granddaughters Kate (left) and Chloe Bradley. Lead truck bidder Allan Doherty may have been camera shy, but not so his granddaughters Kate (left) and Chloe Bradley.
The SCCCR Quarries fleet en route to Albion Park Rail. The SCCCR Quarries fleet en route to Albion Park Rail. The SCCCR Quarries fleet en route to Albion Park Rail.
The Cleary Bros fleet is a regular convoy sight. The Cleary Bros fleet is a regular convoy sight. The Cleary Bros fleet is a regular convoy sight.
The convoy arriving at Croome Road Sporting Complex. The convoy arriving at Croome Road Sporting Complex. The convoy arriving at Croome Road Sporting Complex.
Ian Pendered, driving a Ross Transport Argosy, brought along his grandkids Abbey and Kane. Ian Pendered, driving a Ross Transport Argosy, brought along his grandkids Abbey and Kane. Ian Pendered, driving a Ross Transport Argosy, brought along his grandkids Abbey and Kane.
Ben Urban and daughter Chelsea were in a Premier Transport Group Iveco Turbostar. Ben Urban and daughter Chelsea were in a Premier Transport Group Iveco Turbostar. Ben Urban and daughter Chelsea were in a Premier Transport Group Iveco Turbostar.
Parking space was at a premium along Croome Road. Parking space was at a premium along Croome Road. Parking space was at a premium along Croome Road.
Allan Doherty’s fleet included a White Road Commander. Allan Doherty’s fleet included a White Road Commander. Allan Doherty’s fleet included a White Road Commander.
Glenn Kendall and Dexter. Glenn Kendall and Dexter. Glenn Kendall and Dexter.
The Park Fuels team had four Western Stars in the convoy. Left to right: Stewart Moore; Neil Midgley; Nathan Heath with daughter Isabel, nephew Bailey and stepdaughter Amelia (standing); Sharon Midgley. Also on board was Michael Franke (far right) from Sydney Truck Centre in Milperra. “I’ve got to be careful about what I say about Western Stars, ’cause [Michael] lent me a truck this weekend,” Stewart laughed. The Park Fuels team had four Western Stars in the convoy. Left to right: Stewart Moore; Neil Midgley; Nathan Heath with daughter Isabel, nephew Bailey and stepdaughter Amelia (standing); Sharon Midgley. Also on board was Michael Franke (far right) from Sydney Truck Centre in Milperra. “I’ve got to be careful about what I say about Western Stars, ’cause [Michael] lent me a truck this weekend,” Stewart laughed. The Park Fuels team had four Western Stars in the convoy. Left to right: Stewart Moore; Neil Midgley; Nathan Heath with daughter Isabel, nephew Bailey and stepdaughter Amelia (standing); Sharon Midgley. Also on board was Michael Franke (far right) from Sydney Truck Centre in Milperra. “I’ve got to be careful about what I say about Western Stars, ’cause [Michael] lent me a truck this weekend,” Stewart laughed.
Craig Duren of MJ Rowles Transport is one of the mainstays of the i98FM Camp Quality Convoy. Craig Duren of MJ Rowles Transport is one of the mainstays of the i98FM Camp Quality Convoy. Craig Duren of MJ Rowles Transport is one of the mainstays of the i98FM Camp Quality Convoy.
One of MJ Rowles’ Mack Super-Liners. One of MJ Rowles’ Mack Super-Liners. One of MJ Rowles’ Mack Super-Liners.
i98FM’s Marty Haynes warms up the crowd at Croome Road Sporting Complex. i98FM’s Marty Haynes warms up the crowd at Croome Road Sporting Complex. i98FM’s Marty Haynes warms up the crowd at Croome Road Sporting Complex.
The Australian Trucking Association’s Safety Truck boasted more horsepower than these steeds. The Australian Trucking Association’s Safety Truck boasted more horsepower than these steeds. The Australian Trucking Association’s Safety Truck boasted more horsepower than these steeds.

Illawarra’s trucking industry shone bright for the record-breaking 2015 i98FM Camp Quality Convoy, Greg Bush writes

 

A record amount of funds raised, a first-time lead truck, and a surprising break in the bleak skies were the main talking points following the 2015 i98FM Camp Quality Convoy on November 15.

Held in the New South Wales’ Illawarra region, the annual i98FM Camp Quality Convoy has become the benchmark for charity fundraising convoys around Australia.

The 2015 convoy raised a staggering $1,725,057, easily surpassing the 2014 record of $1,578,190.

Even the threat of rain did not dampen the enthusiasm of the convoy participants, with 764 trucks and 960 motorbikes taking part in the 70-kilometre journey from Appin Road to the Croome Road Sporting Complex at Albion Park Rail.

Hundreds of spectators lined the route, vying for strategic vantage points to cheer on the convoy.

Thousands more waited excitedly at Croome Road, not only for the convoy’s arrival, but in anticipation of the musical talents of pop artists Justice Crew, Luke Koteras and Nathaniel.

Thanks to the efforts of Yatcon Civil, a freestyle motocross event, FMX Jam, added a further dimension to the day’s entertainment.

According to Craig Duren of transport business MJ Rowles, the efforts of Yatcon Civil were not confined to building the mound for the FMX Jam team.

The company also came in handy to help clean up the area following the previous day’s downpour.

"We needed a culvert fixed, and the end of the car park had washed away," Craig says. "I think they spent more time helping us than they did building the bike facility."

Craig is one of the convoy’s organisers, and has made successful bids for the convoy’s lead truck position more than once in previous years.

He was in the running for the 2015 event too, with a bid of $117,000.

2015-i 98FM-Camp -Quality -Convoy ,-Illawarra ,-events ,-TT3

 

Front-running Peterbilt

However, the winning bid came from Allan Doherty of Doherty Transport, with the help of Rob Starcic from Coastal Windows & Doors.

Both companies combined to bid $220,000, just in front of Derek McMahon’s People’s Truck bid of $210,000.

For Allan, who drove a 30-year-old Peterbilt in the convoy, it was his first time up front.

Allan is equally well known for his 23-year involvement in the Variety Club, as well as his game fishing exploits on the Great Barrier Reef north of Cairns.

"It’s probably the cheapest truck here," Allan says of the left-hand-drive Peterbilt. "I’ve owned it for four months, but a mate of mine owned it for five years."

The Peterbilt, one of 10 Doherty trucks in the convoy, also had prime position at the Croome Road grounds.

Unfortunately, the preceding day’s wet weather meant many trucks were unable to park on the grassy hillside.

Some squeezed into the roads inside the complex, while others parked on Croome Road outside the grounds.

 

The Park Fuels team had four Western Stars in the convoy. Left to right: Stewart Moore; Neil Midgley; Nathan Heath with daughter Isabel, nephew Bailey and stepdaughter Amelia (standing); Sharon Midgley. Also on board was Michael Franke (far right) from Sydney Truck Centre in Milperra. "I’ve got to be careful about what I say about Western Stars, ’cause [Michael] lent me a truck this weekend," Stewart laughed.

 

Industry shone

Ian Pendered, CEO of Pentrans Consulting, was one of many who snared a position along the bitumen.

With his grandkids Abbey and Kane in tow, Ian drove a Pentrans-sponsored Ross Transport Freightliner Argosy in the convoy.

He says not only is the convoy a good thing for the Camp Quality kids, it also lights up the streets of Wollongong.

"You see the amount of people that are out there and it makes you feel good about the industry," he says.

Ross Transport director Alan Ross has been one of the convoy’s most active supporters, raising more than $500,000 over the years for Camp Quality.

His trucks are also prominent at other truck events along the eastern seaboard.

However, most of the credit for the success of the i98FM Camp Quality Convoy goes to i98’s breakfast co-host Marty Haynes.

Following his successful launch of the Canberra Convoy for Cancer Families, Marty moved to Wollongong in 2002, and kicked off the Illawarra region’s Camp Quality Convoy three years later.

The rest is history.

 

Glenn Kendall and Dexter.

 

Long road east

Glenn ‘Yogi’ Kendall loves everything about trucks, especially long-distance driving.

He also has a soft spot for kids in need.

So it came as no surprise that for the second year in a row Glenn drove his 1995 Kenworth T900 across the Nullarbor from Katanning in Western Australia to join the i98FM Camp Quality Convoy.

"A mate of mine said to me in 2014 that I should come over for the convoy," Glenn said.

"So I said: ‘Why not?’ I’ve got two healthy kids and life’s great, so it’s the least I can do."

His ‘co-driver’ in the convoy was four-year-old Dexter, who suffers from cerebral palsy.

"Dexter is a survivor, he’s a wonderful kid," Glenn said.

To make it to the November 15 event on time, Glenn left home on Melbourne Cup day.

It meant three weeks away from his Kendall Trucking business — a big call for a one-man owner-driver show.

"It’s the least I can do for what these kids go through," he says.

"And I love this; it’s like a truck driver’s Christmas to me.

"We get to line ’em up, shine ’em up and look a million bucks. And everyone gets in together in this town; it’s fantastic."

Originally from Gippsland, Glenn moved to Western Australia 11 years ago.

He says it suited his independent business of one truck and one trailer: "There’s no ties, no rules, no dramas.

"Trucking out in the west is different, a different community," he continues.

"It’s run right, the fatigue’s right, everything’s right. You tick the boxes and you just truck along."

Glenn wasn’t sure how many kilometres his Kenworth had done, but he believed it to be around 2.5 million.

With a Cummins 525 N14-plus under the bonnet, the T900 was a former John L Pierce Transport truck, Glenn explained.

"It started its life lime green," he says.

"It’s been stolen, it’s been rebuilt and it’s had a lot of love.

"It’s an excellent truck and fantastic to drive," he adds.

"A killer truck."

Glenn lamented the fact that it had been a long time since a similar convoy in Perth was held.

However he was keen to replicate that community spirit in the west.

"We’re starting to get the ball rolling out there," he says.

"We want to show that they’re not just big lumps of metal going down the road. There’s a little more to it, and a little more to truck drivers."

 

 

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