Unwraping Yamaha Racing Team's new rig

By: Russell Colvin


Yamaha Racing Team Superbikes MAN Trailer ATN The Yamaha Racing Team with Yamaha Motorcycle Insurance’s latest transporter looks the goods. Yamaha Racing Team Superbikes MAN Trailer ATN
Yamaha Racing Team Superbikes MAN Trailer ATN2 The Yamaha Racing Team with Yamaha Motorcycle Insurance’s team director John Redding. Yamaha Racing Team Superbikes MAN Trailer ATN2
Yamaha Racing Team Superbikes MAN Trailer ATN3 The 2012 MAN TGX-26 480 is the new member of the Yamaha Racing Team. Yamaha Racing Team Superbikes MAN Trailer ATN3
Yamaha Racing Team Superbikes MAN Trailer ATN4 The bikes get the top floor in the purpose-built trailer. Yamaha Racing Team Superbikes MAN Trailer ATN4
Yamaha Racing Team Superbikes MAN Trailer ATN5 Inside the trailer, Ryan Bennett is happy with the new work bench. Yamaha Racing Team Superbikes MAN Trailer ATN5
Yamaha Racing Team Superbikes MAN Trailer ATN8 Yamaha Racing Team Superbikes MAN Trailer ATN8
Yamaha Racing Team Superbikes MAN Trailer ATN10 Yamaha Racing Team Superbikes MAN Trailer ATN10
Yamaha Racing Team Superbikes MAN Trailer ATN6 The extra load over the trailer’s drive axles, due to the huge generator, meant a truck upgrade was required. Yamaha Racing Team Superbikes MAN Trailer ATN6
Yamaha Racing Team Superbikes MAN Trailer ATN7 The new rig carries these three Yamaha R1Ms, which Glenn Allerton (4), Cru Halliday (6) and Wayne Maxwell (1) pilot in this year’s Australasian Superbike Championship. Yamaha Racing Team Superbikes MAN Trailer ATN7

The Yamaha Racing Team kept with the theme when deciding on a replacement rig for its 2005 MAN TGA 18-360 and trailer. Russell Colvin writes

 

At the fourth round of the premier Australasian Superbike Championship at Queensland Raceway, Yamaha Racing Team with Yamaha Motorcycle Insurance took the covers off on its all-new rig and trailer, which without a doubt stands out in the paddock.

The Murarrie, Queensland-based factory team has upgraded from a 2005 MAN TGA 18-360, which it’s owned since new and has recently just clicked over 250,000km, to a 2012 MAN TGX 26-480.

The old trailer was formerly used by Glenn Seton Racing and an Australian V8 Ute Racing team has been replaced with a 48-foot (14.6m) long trailer.

The trailer was designed and built by Shepparton Motor Body Builders, owned by Rob Coxhell, the father of former Australian Superbike and Yamaha racer Craig Coxhell.

"We had planned for time to upgrade the trailer because the existing trailer was built in 1988 and getting a bit long in the tooth," team director John Redding says.

"The trailer was also on springs, not on air bags, which meant the ride was a bit rougher. So the team suggested that we should look to upgrade."

Yamaha Racing Team, which currently has three riders racing the all new Yamaha YZF-R1M, including Cru Halliday, three times Australian Superbike champion Glenn Allerton and the 2013 Australian Superbike champion and the reigning Australian FX-Superbike and Australasian Superbike champion Wayne Maxwell, decided to build the trailer to something very similar to what Team Suzuki had.

"Rather than reinventing the wheel, we went and spoke to Rob and Craig Coxhell from Shepparton Motor Body Builders and brought a similar rig to what

Phil Tainton had, as they designed his trailer for him when he ran the Suzuki team a few years ago."

Yamaha -Racing -Team ,-Superbikes ,-MAN,-Trailer ,-ATN11

 

Trailer knick-knacks

The trailer features a dedicated media room/rider lounge that allows the riders and team members to kick back and take time out. The lounge also has the riders own locker spaces to keep their belongings, and don’t forget about the TV.

There is a lot more storage and carrying capacity, which has things such as tyres, and all the spare parts to go racing with.

The biggest difference compared to the old trailer is the double floor which sees the bikes being carried up on top, similar to how the V8 Supercar team trucks are.

The floor also goes up-and-down on a ram, which enables the motorcycles to be pushed right up almost to the ceiling, allowing a lot more space underneath.

With everything on board, the total weight should come in at around 29 tonnes.

While Yamaha Racing Team may have had the trailer since March, the only slight little hiccup was the weight distribution within the trailer made it so they could not use their single axle prime mover. The trailer had too much load over the drive axles, mainly because of the huge generator, which powers everything up.

"With the generator and the huge fuel tank for it, that’s another couple of tonnes over the drive axle we didn’t originally expect to have," Redding explains.

This meant the team had to go out and purchase a new rig, which they just got back a few days before the fourth round of the Australasian Superbike Championship after it finished getting painted by Pro-Twins class racer Paul Dutton from Ultra Spray in New South Wales.

From there Ian Buckley, who from time to time drives the Yamaha transporters around, made some trims and improvements such as the guards.

Another key thing to the Yamaha Racing Team’s set-up is the annexe. The Yamaha Racing Team annexe was built by the same company in America that built the Craig Dack Racing Yamaha and Yamaha’s 60th anniversary rolling roadshow trailer.

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Truck familiarisation

So what is this travelling bit of art like to drive?

"While I only drove the truck and trailer from the factory to the circuit, I found that it was different to drive," team manager Kevin Marshall says.

"I definitely have found that this is a heavier rig to steer and to pull."

Just like hopping from one car and into another one, everything is different and this was the same in the truck for Marshall, as it took him a few kilometres to get used to the new toy.

Yamaha’s new MAN TGX-26 480 truck will clock up the miles in the next coming months. Following its two-day test at Wakefield Park just outside Goulburn in early September, Yamaha Racing Team will head back to Queensland before returning back to Wakefield Park for the next round of the Australasian Superbike Championship at the end of September.

From there it will be a quick dash down the Hume Highway for a one-day test at Winton Motorway, and then back to headquarters.

Mid-October will then see the truck make the long trip down south to Phillip Island for the MotoGP support event, before heading back to Winton the following weekend for round six of the Australasian Superbike Championship, then back to Queensland.

The final run will be at the start of December for the grand finale at Sydney Motorsport Park.

 

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