NSW Police see crashes spike hit downward trend


Operation Eli an opportunity to keep up pressure as fatalities fall

 

New South Wales Police insist a fall in truck-related fatalities does not mean the trend is immune to tragic spikes.

The warning and a pledge to keep up pressure on the industry came in the wake of the Operation Eli blitz at heavy vehicle enforcement bays on the M7 Motorway.

Much of the outcome was promising but Traffic and Highway Patrol Command operations commander superintendent Stuart Smith says the operation was necessary, following a number of recent crashes involving heavy vehicles.

"There have been 15 truck crashes in the last three weeks in New South Wales, prompting police to move quickly to ensure heavy vehicles are safe on our roads," Smith adds.

"With three of these recent heavy vehicle crashes resulting in fatalities, we will do all we can to enforce road safety for the benefit of all motorists."

During the operation, police and Roads and Maritime Services (RMS) officers inspected 70 trucks and trailers, issuing 20 defect notices for offences including damaged number plates, tyre deflation, insufficient tread, worn seat belts, faulty lights, cracked windscreens, body rust, oil leaks, and excessive break wear.

Additionally, 11 infringement notices were issued for offences including load restraint, expired labels, running a red light, and a truck driver using a mobile phone.

Officers also conducted 50 random breath tests, and 41 random drug tests, with no positive readings.

You can also follow our updates by liking us on Facebook